Archive for August 2012

An Open Letter To AT&T

August 17, 2012

Dear AT&T,

I have been a loyal customer of yours since the dial-up days of Worldnet. I write this letter to congratulate your company for being so successful that you no longer need me as a customer nor need my money which you have dutifully taken without fanfare from for the past 17 years.

If you are still reading this, I’m amazed because that’s not the attitude the majority of your Customer Support conveys. My recent issues started when we decided to go with a 3rd party VoIP solution and port our existing number to that company. My wife called your Customer Support at least 2 weeks prior to ask if it was possible to port the number and keep our existing DSL connection. She was told there would be no issues. Well, obviously, there is or I wouldn’t be writing this letter.

Our number was ported and my DSL was disconnected leaving me without service. When I called to check on this issue the next day I was told there was no more DSL capacity and my service could not be reinstated. At this point, I was left with no options from AT&T- no DSL and no Uverse in my area.

My case was escalated and I was told very coldly, “there is nothing we can do for you!” Obviously, this was very frustrating to me since I did not ask for my DSL connection to be terminated and was advised there would be no issues.

This exposes what I see as a flaw in your system. No one from AT&T contacted me before, during or after my number was ported. One would think your company would contact me before porting the number for at least the reasons as follows:

1. To ask me why I am not satisfied with the current service and how AT&T could keep me as a dial tone customer.

2. To protect me as your customer and ensure I authorized the porting of my number and was not being taken advantage of by another carrier to steal your business.

3. To warn me that if I go through with the porting that I would not only have an interruption in Internet service but it would be terminated with NO option for reconnection from AT&T.

In retrospect, I wonder if your “at capacity” status is reason for some of the service issues I’ve had over the past years?

In closing, I guess this incident is a blessing. You will not be burden with needing to add my meager monthly payment to your profits. There is probably nothing you could do to bring me back as a customer (and you probably feel you don’t need me) but I hope in some way this incident will flag someone in your large organization who will be able to help the next customer with similar issues.

Thank you for your time. Please excuse me while I research cell carriers to switch my family’s 4 cell phones to.

Sincerely,
Richard Dowell